View Calendar
Loading Events

Upcoming Events

Event

Arkansas in Modern America

About the Program

Ben Johnson will discuss the topics and themes in his book Arkansas in Modern America Since 1930, published in August by the University of Arkansas Press. This second edition is a comprehensive revision of and elaboration on the first edition, which was published in 2000. Johnson incorporates recent scholarship to extend the analysis of economic, social, and cultural developments in Arkansas into the present day.

 

About the Speaker

Ben Johnson is the John G.

Learn More
Event

Off the Grid: A History of Nature, Black Power, and Freedom on the Arkansas Frontier

About the Program

Canebrakes, speckled perch, chinquapins and blackberries, mink and beaver: Arkansas’s natural bounty was a major draw for hundreds of thousands of African Americans who migrated to the state after Emancipation in search of greater freedom and self-determination. What did freedpeople—some native to Arkansas and others newly arrived—learn about their natural environment from their experiences living and working in the New South’s last wilderness?  Through images, stories, and botanical specimens from the field, historian Story Matkin-Rawn and ecologist Theo Witsell will share their research on the challenges of frontier life and use of wild resources among African Americans in the Natural State.

Learn More
Event

Herbert Denton Community Project: An Update

About the Program

Oral historian and writer Benji de la Piedra will give an update on his Herbert Denton Community History Project. Little Rock native Herbert Denton Jr. was a pioneering African American journalist at the Washington Post from 1966 until his death in 1989. His father, Herbert Denton Sr., was a lifelong public educator in Little Rock and a pillar of the city’s black community. De la Piedra is conducting a community history project including compiling oral histories in preparation for writing a biography on Herbert Denton,

Learn More
Event

Race and Women’s Suffrage in Arkansas

About this Legacies & Lunch Presentation

The history of suffrage in Arkansas has always been connected to race. For example, white women activists often used racial arguments to advocate for their own voting rights. At the same time, while African American women in Arkansas had supported the political struggles of the men in their community since Reconstruction as well as organizing for their own vote, they gained only limited access to the franchise with the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.

Learn More